Wanna Win Over Millennials? Privatize Social Security and Drop Opposition To Same-Sex Marriage

Brian Brady Brian Brady 14 Comments

Share

Americans aged 13-30 are much more libertarian than liberal, says a Reason-Rupe report.  That’s important for California Republicans to know because that generation represents close to one in five voters.  In five years, that number will grow to one in four voters.

Millennials have oft been described as the enigma generation when it comes to politics.  They eschew party labels but overwhelmingly supported President Obama in 2008 and 2012.   Why would a generation, saddled with student loan debt, living with their parents, underemployed, vote for a President with such a poor record on economic freedom?

Millennials are optimistic, perhaps more so than any generation before it:

Is alienation from these most traditional pillars of society getting them down? Not in the least. Millennials are more likely than their elders to believe that the nation’s best days are ahead and to trust that they’ll have enough money to lead the lives they want.

Moreover, millennials value personal freedom, so much that when the Reason-Rupe survey asked them about same sex marriage, fully 2/3 support it and 25 percent said they would reject a candidate who opposed it, regardless of where he/she stood on all the other issues.  That, in itself, should run chills down candidates’ spines.

Their anti-authoritarian streak isn’t limited to social issues though.  Millennials think government is inept, inefficient, and doing too much.  They support privatizing social security accounts, lower taxes, and less government spending.

Communicating with them will be hard.  They don’t identify with political parties, organized churches, or traditional institutions in civil society.  They live in a digital community and policy ideas are what move them politically.

Political consultants should read the full survey.  It’s 105 pages and is pretty detailed.  A good opportunity exists for the California Republican Party if we place our emphasis on fiscal issues and minimize the social issues in the conversation.  The candidate who is viewed as the greatest advocate for personal freedom wins these voters over.  That’s something worth of consideration.

Share

Comments 14

  1. Rep. David Jolly said it best yesterday:

    “As a matter of my Christian faith, I believe in traditional marriage,” Jolly said in a statement to the Post. “But as a matter of constitutional principle I believe in a form of limited government that protects personal liberty. To me, that means that the sanctity of one’s marriage should be defined by their faith and by their church, not by their state.”

    Nobody is asking anyone to change their personal views, simply changing the expectation that a government can qualify a relationship.

    Working the Log Cabin booth at SD Pride this weekend was incredible. People one after another came up to the booth and whispered “I’m a Republican”. They shouldn’t have to whisper it, and they shouldn’t have to feel like the party has abandoned them.

    And guess what? Millennials like how Governors Scott Walker, Chris Christie, and Susanna Martinez can say their peace on their personal views of marriage and at the same time vow to not spend any more taxpayer dollars on appealing rulings that have legalized same-sex marriage. Obviously millennials may disagree with their personal views, but they respect their policy positions, and thats enough to gain their support.

    Obviously we’ll need strong laws to ensure that religious organizations maintain their right to free association and aren’t forced to perform any marriages they disagree with, but government should be equitable. Besides, more marriages means less tax revenue, forcing the Democrats hand on reigning in spending to sustainable levels.

    Thanks for this post Brian.

  2. Post
    Author

    “Obviously we’ll need strong laws to ensure that religious organizations maintain their right to free association”

    We have that already; the First Amendment. I am convinced that the more consistent Republicans are to the Constitution, the more credibility we’ll have in the eyes of the electorate.

    Thank you for registering voters in what is generally accepted to be hostile territory

  3. Brian you and I both know the first amendment guarantees that, but in a post-Hobby Lobby world, we may need explicit legislation to spell it out.

  4. The U.S. Constitution / Bill of Rights was not intended to enforce itself. It is “we the people” who are supposed to do that.

    As the character of the electorate improves so will the character of the law maker whom we give consent to be governed by.

    Character (internal government) increases/decreases in direct correlation to the size of external government so I am not a proponent of more law.

  5. Social Security is worth taking up. Privitization in the past opened up attacks that it was basically handing over the SS trust fund to Wall Street. However, if we emphasize the SS and even the state pensions should be owned by the individuals (to invest as best meets their needs) and not the state we’d be better off.

  6. re: dropping Social Security – good idea if done right
    re: endorse same-sex marriage?

    why are these 2 specific issues talked about and not the bigger picture of the greater agenda? are we not supposed to look at the bigger picture? and just focus on what we are told to focus on?

    Republicans asked to accept more untraditional relationships because they want a bigger tent.

    other groups or religions are also watching what the Republicans do so they can position themselves for ‘acceptance’ in the mainstream.
    ie. Sharia law has gotten a foothold in this country. lots of arranged marriages between girls bet 9 – 15 and Muslim men. (But Obama indicated that America is now a muslim nation)
    This is a major problem now – because we do not talk about it. .
    http://www.trust.org/item/?map=forced-marriage-in-america-many-women-dont-know-their-rights-fear-to-claim-them/

    As long as we have our current mindset we will all be drones and forced to believe that there is absolutely nothing we can do about it. .
    Right now, we are told to do what the govt says, accept untraditional relationships, accept Common Core (deliberate dumbing down of our kids, accept mass amnesty, accept global governance/Agenda 21 and on and on.
    Are you a good Republican drone?
    or are you an American who wants to hand down to your kids (or the younger generation) a free and sovereign nation called America?

  7. OK, to get the younger generation promise them endless, free goodies and toss the social/moral issues and we see how well that is working in California. Oh, wait, there is a party that has that market cornered, they are called Democrats! So the solution is for all of us to become Democrats and we will win every election! Problem solved.

  8. Lee,

    “But Obama indicated that America is now a muslim nation.”

    When exactly did he do that? Citation, please.

  9. Lee,

    arranged marriages are a problem but not a major one. What % of american marriages are arranged?

    The Muslim hysteria in this country is unreal. Yeah, radicals snuck one in on 9/11 but in no realistic scenario was Al Qaeda ever going to perform a Romanesque Triumph down Pennsylvania Ave in. They are not the Axis. They are not the Soviets. By historical comparison we are in an Imperial Policing mode since we are the sole superpower. Boko Haram, ISIS, Al Qaeda are all bad people but none of them require the billions of spent and attention given to them.

    We’re in dangerous waters. In historical analogy, after the Roman civil wars and before Parthia became a threat Rome absorbed itself in local matters angering the populace of its allies and client states (check your NT for context). as a result it sowed the seeds of decline as people that originally allied with Rome for mutual prosperity became embittered as Rome dictated its values and rules into their culture. Then came the Dark Ages.

  10. re: my remark about Obama indicaing we are a muslim nation.
    In 1988
    – President Reagan designated the First Thursday in May of each year as the National Day of Prayer.
    In June 2007
    – (then) Presidential Candidate Barack Obama declared that the USA “Was no longer a Christian nation.”
    In 2009
    – President Obama canceled the 21st annual National Day of Prayer ceremony at the White House under the ruse Of “not wanting to offend anyone”
    BUT…
    on September 25, 2009… a National Day of Prayer for the Muslim religion was held on Capitol Hill, beside the White House. There were over 50,000 Muslims in D.C. that day”
    To add to that,
    in his book, Obama said “If the political winds ever grow ugly, I will always side with the Muslims.”

  11. Let me tell you, as a millennial, what won’t win you support or even a listening ear:

    -Indicating any credibility behind the claim of Barack Obama being a muslim.
    -Using “fringe” words like “sovereign” or “agenda 21”.
    -Using the term “sheeple”.

    Millennials are just going to view you as a tin foil hat-wearing conspiracy theorist, and then it wont matter how good your tax plan is.

  12. Lee, the “facts” you state have been widely discredited. When you take your information from email chains and crackpot websites, you end up with bad information. It goes without saying that few here support Obama, but credible conservatives need to be above reproach. Do some real research before spreading false or incomplete information. Or, go someplace else.

    Just one instance…

    Actual quote from “The Audacity of Hope”: 

    “Of course, not all my conversations in immigrant communities follow this easy pattern. In the wake of 9/11, my meetings with Arab and Pakistani Americans, for example, have a more urgent quality, for the stories of detentions and FBI questioning and hard stares from neighbors have shaken their sense of security and belonging. They have been reminded that the history of immigration in this country has a dark underbelly; they need specific assurances that their citizenship really means something, that America has learned the right lessons from the Japanese internments during World War II, and that I will stand with them should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.”

    We’ll leave it to the reader to decide what that means, but it doesn’t appear to be what you claim.

  13. Lee,

    If the political winds grow ugly, I’ll side with Buddhists if they’re being persecuted for practicing their Faith…or Muslims…or Jews…or Christians. I care about the First Amendment.

    In fairness to the White House Resident, his statement is what I would say any and every day

  14. ok. I stand corrected on a couple of issues. I am trying to be accurate. But I stand firm on the main issue – we are losing our country and running out of peaceful options. The solution bandied about won’t solve it either. – link to that solution http://newswithviews.com/JBWilliams/williams283.htm

    But I listened to a radio show interview last night (7/24/14) (link below) . I urge you to listen to what he has to say about the problems facing America. He puts it into perspective. . . .
    Biography:
    Craig B Hulet was both speech writer and Special Assistant for Special Projects to Congressman Jack Metcalf (Retired).
    He has been a consultant to federal law enforcement ATF&E of Justice/Homeland Security for over 20 years.
    Hulet served in Vietnam 1969-70, 101st Airborne, C Troop 2/17th Air Cav and graduated 3rd in his class at Aberdeen Proving Grounds Ordnance School MOS 45J20 Weapons.
    He remains a paid analyst and consultant in various areas of geopolitical, business and security issues.

    link – http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2014/07/24

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.